December 14, 2017

Shooting Into Mirrors

There is something about shooting into mirrors that pulls on one's visual senses. It's as if the photographer is removed from scene, more of an observer than a recorder. The reflective image becomes less confrontational, more sublime, timeless. The photographer feels like a voyeur listening uninvited on a private conversation with the ability to get in close without repercussions. The world is not seen through a mirrored lens. Composition doesn't suffer. A quote written on the mirror becomes another layer which in this case assumes an object like presence. Slightly out of focus yet legible enough to read, it cuts through the center of the photo like a knife. The eyes can't help but try to read the message.

naked motel tees

naked motel tees

Photographers have always had an affinity to doing self-portraits. Place a camera on a tripod and set the time exposure and jump back into the picture frame. Extend one's arm out as far as possible and point the camera back at oneself. Or shoot into a mirror. When shooting people staring at themselves while looking into mirrors, keep composition in mind otherwise you might find yourself in the frame, which in some cases may be the intention.

Comments

  1. Ma. Vinness says:

    I like taking a picture of myself at the mirror. I just have a hard time controlling the lighting since I can’t use the flash setting.

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